The Jewish Museum Frankfurt’s Thoughtful Addition and Expansion

Frankfurt’s original museum of Jewish antiquities — Germany’s first — was barely 16 years old when it was destroyed by the Nazis in 1938. By the end of the Second World War, the vast majority of the city’s 30,000 Jews had been murdered in the Holocaust. In 1988, on the 50th anniversary of Kristallnacht, the city inaugurated a new Jewish Museum, this one with two branches: one on the site of Frankfurt’s former ghetto, which is dedicated to Jewish life and culture in the medieval and early modern era, and another situated in a pair of connected mansions, covering the period from 1811 (when the ghetto was finally abolished) to the present day.

Recessed lighting in the subtly textured concrete surfaces augments the balance of…

The post The Jewish Museum Frankfurt’s Thoughtful Addition and Expansion appeared first on Azure Magazine.

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