We all know artists who do incredible work, but fail to achieve their professional goals.

It’s tragic and feels unfair.

At the same time, I’ll bet you can also name several artists who enjoy great commercial success, they’re achieving professional goals – yet their work leaves you scratching your head and wondering why?

Why them?

Why do some artists achieve their professional goals and not others?

It would be better for all of us, artists and the culture alike, if only the best artwork was rewarded.

But the world doesn’t always operate like that – especially the art world.

The truth is that those who focus their energies toward marketing and promotion usually achieve their artistic professional goals.

It isn’t always the quality of the art that opens doors, but the fact that those artists know what doors to knock on and how to do the knocking.

But without spending energy toward a connection with creativity, with ideas, with technical excellence, the quality of the work will simply not be there.

And it’s this quality of the work that really drives artists.

As much as we may crave success, I can’t think of one artist who doesn’t really strive for greatness. No one wants to be considered a hack for their creative work, no matter how much money they make.

So how does an artist make great work while achieving their professional goals?

There’s a fine balance that artists must achieve between the doing nuts and bolts of the work, and connecting with the spark of the muse.

It’s a dance between execution and vision.

And it’s really, really difficult to do both well.

We all wish we had more time to devote to the artwork. We all fear we don’t put in enough time to promote the artwork.

The result is that we’re often exhausted and guilt-ridden.

And it’s not just you, every artist struggles with this.

But I’ve learned to accept that it is a dance. Sometimes the creativity gets to lead. Other times the business stuff keeps the beat.

What’s important to succeeding as an artist is that you don’t sacrifice one for the other. There must be a balance between the business and the creative.

And you know when you’re out of balance.

Are you focusing too much on making the work? Is the inventory starting to stockpile? Have you allowed your marketing efforts to languish?

Or have you been so involved in pushing the work that you’ve lost touch with your own creative spark? Has your connection with The Muse suffered?

You can do this.

No matter where you find yourself right now in the dance, I invite you to take the lead.

If you’re waiting for permission to promote your work, this is it. I am giving you that permission. Your work deserves it.

If you need encouragement to engage with your creativity on a deeper level, I’m cheering you on. Take that time for yourself because it is so vital.

Can you hear the music playing? Take the lead and start to dance.

Because life is playing your song.

Would you like to SHOW + SELL MORE ART? I’ve helped thousands of artists and I can help you too.

Join now. It’s free. No spam. Unsubscribe when you want.

 

Working in the international world of contemporary art, Crista Cloutier has spent her career selling art and marketing art to art galleries, museums and private collections. 

Using her professional experiences, Crista has created The Working Artist Masterclass, where she’s developed a global reputation as an artist’s coach. Crista can teach you how to be an artist; including how to sell your art, how to sell art online, how to sell photographs, how to price your art, how to succeed at art fairs, and even how to find your art style. 

Crista has worked with established, blue-chip artists to raise their profile and attract greater opportunities. And she’s also helped thousands of emerging artists to build a professional art practice. To learn more, visit https://theworkingartist.com

The post The Artist’s Dance first appeared on The Working Artist.

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