This painting was damaged during my move from Central Russia to the sea. Of course, I was very upset to see this. But then I realized that this flaw adds character to the picture, just as obstacles harden people. I think she’ll find her master.

“Through the sky, covered with cast-iron clouds, here and there a bright sunlight breaks through. And so easy to breathe in the field, through which sweeps a fresh, warm wind.”

Initially, the picture was inspired by a photo that shows a Golden field with grazing sheep at the foot of the mountain, where spruce trees are thickly blooming.

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I create a calming atmosphere for people.
I strive to convey harmony and calmness to the audience. I relax the man by using smooth transitions, a small number of colors and objects.

My work cannot be repeated, because the paint flows freely, without obstacles, only directed by me.
I use only high-quality materials. Ink, with proper storage of paintings, retains its saturation for up to 100 years.

Acrylic ink on cotton canvas with a density of 380 g/m².
The pine subframe exudes the scent of wood. Gallery wrapped canvas.
The work is signed on both sides.
Each of my paintings is accompanied by a certificate of authenticity.

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